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Papillon 1973 123movies

Papillon 1973 123movies

The greatest adventure of escape!Dec. 13, 1973151 Min.
Your rating: 0
6 1 vote

Synopsis

#123movies #fmovies #putlocker #gomovies #solarmovie #soap2day Watch Full Movie Online Free – A semi-fictional account of Henri Charrière’s time in the penal system in French Guyana – some of it spent on infamous Devil’s Island – is presented. It’s the early 1930s. Charrière – nicknamed Papillon because of his butterfly tattoo – and Louis Dega are two among many who have been convicted in the French judicial system, they now being transferred to French Guyana where they will serve their time, never to return to France even if they are ever released. A safe-cracker by criminal profession, Papillon is serving a life sentence for murdering a pimp, a crime for which he adamantly states he was framed. Dega is a wealthy counterfeiter, who expects his well-to-do wife eventually to get him released. At Papillon’s initiative, the duo enters into a business arrangement: Papillon will provide protection for Dega, who, in turn, will finance Papillon’s escape attempt. As the two men spend more time together than either had expected, their burgeoning friendship ends up being an important factor altering their original plans, needed as they work with and against others who are trying to achieve their own goals, sometime conflicting with those of Papillon and Dega.
Plot: A man befriends a fellow criminal as the two of them begin serving their sentence on a dreadful prison island, which inspires the man to plot his escape.
Smart Tags: #colonist #eating_an_insect #sweating #escape_plan #man_hunter #bribe #self_inflicted_wound #corrupt_prison_officials #public_nudity #centipede #prison_warden #hopelessness #shot_to_death #manhunter #manhunt #hunter #hunt #escaped_prisoner #counterfeiter #exemplary_punishment #firearm


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Ratings:

Papillon 1973 123movies 1Papillon 1973 123movies 28.0/10 Votes: 126,697
Papillon 1973 123movies 3Papillon 1973 123movies 279%
Papillon 1973 123movies 5Papillon 1973 123movies 258/100
Papillon 1973 123movies 7Papillon 1973 123movies 27.9 Votes: 1371 Popularity: 11.683

Reviews:

Grim and authentic telling of Henri “Papillon” Charrière’s time at Devil’s Island.

Directed by Franklin J. Schaffner (Planet Of The Apes/Patton), Papillon is adapted for the screen by Dalton Trumbo & Lorenzo Semple Jr. from notorious French felon Henri “Papillon” Charrière’s own novel. It stars Steve McQueen (Papillon) & Dustin Hoffman (Louis Dega), is primarily shot in Jamaica & Spain with Fred J. Koenekamp (The Towering Inferno) on photography duties and Jerry Goldsmith provides the score.

Henri “Papillon” Charrière was a crook, a bad egg, he however was sent to the notorious, inescapable, prison fortress of Devil’s Island for a murder he didn’t commit. The film, as is the book, is a fictionalised account of Charrière’s time at the penal colony.

The film is probably best described as being a stirring drama of friendship under duress, endurance and opportunism, all neatly blended with an adventure based heart. Schaffner directs it with great technical skill, for in a film with minimal dialogue, he manages to perfectly stifle the viewer with a hot sweaty atmosphere. Something that is crucial for us to feel the confines of this penal colony life. These men are doing hard time, lets not soft soap it Hollywood style, lets get the feel right, something, that much like Don Siegel also did in 79 with his excellent Escape From Alcatraz, Schaffner does exceptionally well. He is helped enormously by two fabulous performances from McQueen & Hoffman.

McQueen is in his element as Papillon. Always an actor whose ability for dominating scenes without using histrionic acting was undervalued, Papillon goes some way to readdressing the myth that he was more about iconography than actual talent. His solitary confinement scenes are sublime, without saying barely a word. As Papillon stave’s off starvation, madness and disease, McQueen has such a powerful and believable presence, he pulls us into that five by five paces cell with him. Incredible! Once again tho the Academy ignored McQueen’s excellent work and the film only received the one Oscar nomination for Goldsmith’s pinging tropical score. Hoffman’s great work was something of a given, meticulous as usual in his preparation N/A, he is the perfect foil for McQueen and the relationship is tender yet never twee. Fine support also comes from Anthony Zerbe as a compassionate leader of a leper colony & Victor Jory as an Indian Chief.

The production was an expensive one, with the original budget of $4 million ballooning to $14 million, making it the most expensive film of 1973. A couple of scripts were jettisoned N/A before Schaffner enlisted Trumbo to write the screenplay. A good move because Trumbo was able to flesh out character relationships that didn’t exist in the source novel. Hoffman himself was adamant that he would only play Dega if the film steered away from a buddy buddy formula and gave Dega intelligent integrity. He got it, which is credit to Trumbo since the Dega character is barely formed in the novel, in fact the film version is an amalgamation of several penal colony characters. Trumbo was rewarded with not only a considerable paycheck, but also a bit part in the movie as the colony commandant early in the piece.

Initial critical reaction to the film was harsh, but the public didn’t agree since the theatres were packed and the film made almost $50 million Worldwide. Making it Allied Artists most successful film ever. It has since garnered a massive fan base and has been favourably reassessed by a new wave of critics. Those old complaints about it being too sombre and too enduring to get thru just don’t add up. One only has to note the thematics and essence of the story to know this fact. 9/10

Review By: John Chard Rating: 9 Date: 2019-01-26
Grim and authentic telling of Henri “Papillon” Charrière’s time at Devil’s Island.

Directed by Franklin J. Schaffner (Planet Of The Apes/Patton), Papillon is adapted for the screen by Dalton Trumbo & Lorenzo Semple Jr. from notorious French felon Henri “Papillon” Charrière’s own novel. It stars Steve McQueen (Papillon) & Dustin Hoffman (Louis Dega), is primarily shot in Jamaica & Spain with Fred J. Koenekamp (The Towering Inferno) on photography duties and Jerry Goldsmith provides the score.

Henri “Papillon” Charrière was a crook, a bad egg, he however was sent to the notorious and inescapable prison fortress of Devil’s Island for a murder he didn’t commit. The film, as is the book, is a fictionalised account of Charrière’s time at the penal colony.

The film is probably best described as being a stirring drama of friendship under duress, endurance and opportunism, all neatly blended with an adventure based heart. Schaffner directs it with great technical skill, for in a film with minimal dialogue, he manages to perfectly stifle the viewer with a hot sweaty atmosphere. This is crucial for us to feel the confines of this penal colony life. These men are doing hard time, lets not soft soap it Hollywood style, lets get the feel right, something, that much like Don Siegel also did in 79 with his excellent Escape From Alcatraz, Schaffner does exceptionally well. He is helped enormously by two fabulous performances from McQueen & Hoffman.

McQueen is in his element as Papillon. Always an actor whose ability for dominating scenes without using histrionic acting was undervalued, Papillon goes some way to readdressing the myth that he was more about iconography than actual talent. His solitary confinement scenes are sublime, and this without saying barely a word. As Papillon staves off starvation, madness and disease, McQueen has such a powerful and believable presence that he pulls us into that five by five paces cell alongside him. Incredible! Once again though the Academy ignored McQueen’s excellent work and the film only received just the one Oscar nomination for Goldsmith’s pinging tropical score. Hoffman’s great work was something of a given, meticulous as usual in his preparation (he had studied for weeks about penal colony life), he is the perfect foil for McQueen and the relationship between them is tender yet never twee. Fine support also comes from Anthony Zerbe as a compassionate leader of a leper colony & Victor Jory as an Indian Chief.

The production was an expensive one, with the original budget of $4 million ballooning to $14 million, making it the most expensive film of 1973. A couple of scripts were jettisoned (money down the drain) before Schaffner enlisted Trumbo to write the screenplay. A good move because Trumbo was able to flesh out character relationships that didn’t exist in the source novel. Hoffman himself was adamant that he would only play Dega if the film steered away from a buddy buddy formula and gave Dega intelligent integrity. He got it, which is credit to Trumbo since the Dega character is barely formed in the novel, in fact the film version is an amalgamation of several penal colony characters. Trumbo was rewarded with not only a considerable paycheck, but also a bit part in the movie as the colony commandant early in the piece.

Initial critical reaction to the film was harsh, but the public didn’t agree since the theatres were packed and the film made almost $50 million Worldwide. This made it Allied Artists most successful film ever. It has since garnered a massive fan base and has been favourably reassessed by a new wave of critics. Those old complaints about it being too sombre and too enduring to get through just don’t add up. One only has to note the thematics and essence of the story to know that this is indeed fact. 8/10

Review By: John Chard Rating: 9 Date: 2019-01-27
A Fine Film Which Does The Book Justice
Usually, after reading a long book filled with many interesting adventures, watching a two-hour film later winds up being a big disappointment. There is no way a film can give you anywhere near the info you glean from a book, especially one over 500 pages as is the case with “Papillion.” Yet, despite most of Henri Charriere’s incredible feats of survival, (“Papillion” was Charriere’s nickname) this movie is above average and basically does the book justice. The movie runs about two-and-a-half hours and gives enough of a flavor to have the viewer appreciate – at least to some degree – the brutal trials and tribulations Papillion went through in real life.

If you enjoyed this film, the book is a “must-read” for you and very highly-recommend You won’t believe all the things Charriere experienced: good and bad. In real life, the man escaped something like eight times and each time went through hell.

Steve McQueen, playing “Papillion,” was excellent. He was particularly good at showing the physical effects of years of solitary confinement. By the way, in real life, Charriere was much younger went sent to jail than McQueen was at the time this movie was shot. Papillion should have been played by a younger actor, but who’s going to complain when you get an actor of McQueen’s caliber?

Dustin Hoffman also was great as Papillion’s friend, “Louis Dega,” who had a bigger role in the movie than he did in the book. For the most part, Papillion had a number of friends, all helping him over the years. Hoffman also provided some good comic relief to the movie and, heaven knows, it needed it. Take it from someone who has read the book: this is a grim story, worse than what you saw on screen here.

Nevertheless, thanks to the two leading actors and the wonderful work by Director Franklin Schaffner and Cinematograher Fred Koenekamp, this long film entertained. No, it wasn’t the caliber of the book, but it’s didn’t insult it, either, and is definitely worth a look.

Review By: ccthemovieman-1 Rating: 9 Date: 2009-05-18
as I’m sure others have said, the ‘Other’ Great Escape – unsentimental and often harsh
Papillon is a story of what men will do in a time of crisis, such as being in a rather hellish penal prison colony run by the French on one of their islands. Steve McQueen was probably the only actor that I can think of from the period who could portray this character, at least if this had to be done the Hollywood way (of course the man was French, Henri Carriere, so this goes without saying not counting French actors; perhaps Belmondo could’ve pulled it off, who knows). But there’s so much that happens in his story, spanning many years (seemingly decades, though it’s never completely clear), that I kept finding myself thinking ‘Ok, oh wow, what happens next?”‘

It actually isn’t entirely a prison movie, it should be noted; the last hour mostly takes place when Papillon, his friend Louis Dega (Dustin Hoffman) and another prisoner find a way to get off of the island by boat. But I think the parts of the film I will remember for, well, forever, will be the scenes set in at the prison, and even those early scenes where the filmmaker, Franklin J Schaffner (via writers Trumbo and Semple), simply shows what the situation is: all these men put together, most if not all of them have done something likely prison-worthy, but for this place, this setting, an entire ocean away from their homeland is the thing. Indeed an early scene on the ship that takes the prisoners across the sea, and when Papillon first gets into trouble (one of those middle-of-the-night attack things) is just a small sample of what horrors await him.

What Papillon and Dega have done does count, up to a point – these men are a safe-cracker who got a falsely accused murder rap and a counterfeiter respectively – and the actors make them vulnerable and just interesting to watch. So that by the time these men are having to watch all the time to not end up on a s***-list, it gets tense. And yet, it being Papillon as played by Steve frigging McQueen, the star of The Great Escape, we might hope that he has one goal: to get the hell out. But there’s no special motorcycle to do a jump over in this case. When this character gets caught, he has to do more time – in solitary – which is around a 15-20 minute chunk in the middle of this film.

I should be clear on this point: if you’ve seen certain scenes set in solitary confinement in other movies, this is one of the most brutal to watch if not just right up there (oddly enough perhaps the other McQueen’s film Hunger tops it). We see Papillon stuck in a cell for what feels like a while – and it ends up being two years (!) – and the whole purpose, as he is told by the main prison warden, is to break him from mind to body, from head to toe. And one sees McQueen, giving it his all as an actor, becoming unhinged at a lot of points, eating bugs, having dream-hallucinations of his past in France and with his old friends (and dead fellow prisoners), and it’s staggering work. Overall in this film I don’t know if I’ve seen this man give so much for a character; for an actor who was often known for playing quiet, stoic types (and he could do it well), here it’s more like hanging it all out. Which, when playing up against someone like Dustin Hoffman, it’s a good idea not to be sleepwalking in a role.

Papillon puts so many stakes for its characters, and yet what sets it apart from other prison-break-out movies are two things mainly: how bleak and unrelenting the pressure and suspense is, that at any minute everything can very feasibly fall apart (as the writing and direction make clear, this is a painfully realistic world, or a realistically painful one, same thing), and the location. It’s beautiful in the jungles and beaches, but a lot of things can kill you (or people, like the lepers). The only real flaw for me is when the movie slows down just at point of the second to third act when Papillon winds up with the natives on the beach. There’s no dialog, which is a nice experiment, but it drags the story down: up until then things have been epic in scope, but the pace is fast and it’s all down to the story. If anything drags it, it’s this unnecessary sequence.

But by the ending, and it’s really in the last 15/20 minutes that this tale gains some awesome pathos while still being a tough ‘guy’ movie, you see what this journey has done for these two men. The characters are built up so well enough, and portrayed with enough grit and honesty, that we care every step of the way (Hoffman really sells the nebbishness, but taking it from caricature to realism). Oh, and Jerry Goldsmith’s score, which isn’t constant but has enough for you to notice it, is a triumph of adventure/action/drama music for a movie of this kind.

Review By: Quinoa1984 Rating: 9 Date: 2015-08-29

Other Information:

Original Title Papillon
Release Date 1973-12-13
Release Year 1973

Original Language en
Runtime 2 hr 31 min (151 min)
Budget 12000000
Revenue 53267000
Status Released
Rated R
Genre Biography, Crime, Drama
Director Franklin J. Schaffner
Writer Dalton Trumbo, Lorenzo Semple Jr., Henri Charrière
Actors Steve McQueen, Dustin Hoffman, Victor Jory
Country France, United States
Awards Nominated for 1 Oscar. 2 wins & 2 nominations total
Production Company N/A
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix 4-Track Stereo (magnetic prints), Mono (optical prints)
Aspect Ratio 2.35 : 1
Camera Panavision PSR, Panavision C-Series and Cooke Lenses (uncredited)
Laboratory Technicolor, Hollywood (CA), USA (print)
Film Length 4,130 m (Sweden)
Negative Format 35 mm (Eastman 100T 5254)
Cinematographic Process Panavision (anamorphic)
Printed Film Format 35 mm

Papillon 1973 123movies
Papillon 1973 123movies
Original title Papillon
TMDb Rating 7.9 1,371 votes

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