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Patton 1970 123movies

Patton 1970 123movies

The Rebel Warrior172 Min.
Your rating: 0
8 1 vote

Summary:

#123movies #fmovies #putlocker #gomovies #solarmovie #soap2day Watch Full Movie Online Free – “Patton” tells the tale of General George S. Patton, famous tank commander of World War II. The film begins with Patton’s career in North Africa and progresses through the invasion of Europe and the fall of the Third Reich. Side plots also speak of Patton’s numerous faults such his temper and tendency toward insubordination, faults that would prevent him from becoming the lead American general in the Normandy Invasion as well as to his being relieved as Occupation Commander of Germany.
Plot: “Patton” tells the tale of General George S. Patton, famous tank commander of World War II. The film begins with patton’s career in North Africa and progresses through the invasion of Germany and the fall of the Third Reich. Side plots also speak of Patton’s numerous faults such his temper and habit towards insubordination.
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Ratings:

Patton 1970 123movies 1Patton 1970 123movies 27.9/10 Votes: 98,924
Patton 1970 123movies 3Patton 1970 123movies 294%
Patton 1970 123movies 5Patton 1970 123movies 291/100
Patton 1970 123movies 7Patton 1970 123movies 27.5 Votes: 765 Popularity: 10.688

Reviews:

Fascinating portrait of the Allies’ greatest general
A few years ago, I had the pleasure of reading “The Patton Papers,” a collection of Gen. Patton’s diary entries and letters edited by Martin Blumenson. Having seen the movie, I think that no actor has ever better captured the spirit of a man better than George C. Scott, nor has any movie better portrayed that spirit than PATTON.

Patton was a man who lived for war. World War II was the high point and culmination of his life. He didn’t fight for any principles, he didn’t fight to defend freedom or democracy or any abstract idea; he fought because he loved fighting. In his diaries you can read of his fear of flunking out of West Point; the prospect terrified him because he was certain that he would never be good at anything except being a general or a leader of a country.

As a leader of men, he was exceptional. His speech at the beginning of the movie is vintage Patton, an almost exact reproduction of a speech Patton actually gave to Third Army. It’s tough, and no-nonsense; Patton lets you know in no uncertain terms that he is here to win, to destroy the enemy, and by God you’d better be too. I don’t know if Patton actually directed traffic on the roads as he is shown doing in the movie, but it was a very Pattonish thing to do. Patton did on at least one occasion get out of his staff car and join a squad of G.I.’s in heaving a vehicle out of the mud. Try to imagine Montgomery doing that; the very thought is hilarious!

Patton’s character explains his treatment of his men. To those who had been wounded fighting for him he was always kind and considerate. But to those whose minds could not stand the horrible strain that war imposed on them, he was merciless; he could not comprehend the fact that other people didn’t share his love of violence for violence’ sake. PATTON shows this aspect of his character very well.

Karl Malden’s Omar Bradley is shown in an almost father-like role; he sees and recognizes Patton’s immense talents as a general, and uses them in spite of Patton’s natural ability to antagonize everybody around him. Not shown in the movie is Patton’s unloveable characteristic of turning on his subordinates once they surpassed him in their careers. Patton had nothing but good to say about Bradley, until Bradley was promoted over Patton’s head, whereupon Patton savaged Bradley in his diary. Patton did the same to Eisenhower.

A general can have no higher compliment than the fear and respect of his adversaries, and as PATTON demonstrates, Patton was more feared by the Germans than any other Allied general, at least on the Western front. As one German officer observes all too prophetically, “the absence of war will destroy him [Patton].” And although mankind’s single greatest stroke of good fortune in the 20th century was that Russia and America never came to blows, it is still hard not to feel sorry for Patton as he desperately seeks his superiors’ approval to carry the war on eastward into the Soviet Union – anything, just to have a war to fight. Patton is like an addict to a destructive drug.

Hollywood has rarely given us such a textured and human portrait of a great man: cruel, often foolish in his relations with others, rude, and psychopathically attached to violence, but brave, dedicated, and loyal. Certainly those who, like myself, have Jewish blood, or who were otherwise marked for death by the Nazi state, all owe him a great debt of gratitude for his pivotal role in destroying that state. And yet, had he been born German, Patton would surely have fought just as devotedly for the Nazi side. I’m glad he wasn’t.

Rating: **** out of ****.

Review By: Danimal-7 Rating: 9 Date: 1999-09-08
Epic hagiography
It’s a splendidly done movie. Scott’s performance is powerful. He does everything but reach out, grab you by the shirt, and shout in your face. Karl Malden is likable and full of common sense, but he is the only person in the movie whom we can grasp as a character — except for Scott himself. Scott is as good at his job as Patton was, and in fact the quality of his performance is less volatile than Patton’s own, with virtually no weak spots.

That’s part of the problem. Patton himself. I suppose that like most people he had a “good” side — loving family, played with his dog, collected stamps and whatnot. But as good and aggressive a general as he was, he wasn’t a particularly likable guy. It’s easy to demand that everyone in your command have shoes as shiny as yours — especially when you’ve got some black PFC doing your shining for you.

The movie is noticeably slanted. Patton’s weakness, like Coriolanus’s, is ambition. Sometimes it’s played for laughs. He carried the stars of a Lieutenant General around with him until word of his promotion comes down, then immediately has them pinned on. But only three times is his meanness illustrated without tongue in cheek. (1) During a conversation with Bradley he reveals that he’s disobeyed orders by sending his army on a mission to beat Montgomery in taking Sicily. He calls the attack “a reconnaissance in force”. He receives an order to get his troops back where they belong and tells his aide to send the message back because it’s garbled. “A simple old soldier,” Bradly comments disapprovingly. (2) He orders General Truscott to stage some amphibious landings which will help him take Messina before Montgomery. Truscott complains that they’re not prepared to do that without heavy casualties. Patton lies down and threatens to fire Truscott and get someone else to do the job. (3) While visiting a hospital and presenting the wounded with decorations he comes across a soldier whose nerves are shot and who is weeping, and Patton slaps him twice and sends him back to the front.

His mean streak went beyond those incidents. He used to practice his arrogant, threatening scowl in front of the mirror. Whether or not it improved the GI’s morale to wear neckties in combat is, at best, arguable. (What would Patton make of the Israeli army?) But the simple historical fact is that the movie pitches even these “mean” incidents at the audience like softballs. He didn’t just slap a soldier who was feeling sorry for himself, which is the picture the film presents. He slapped two soldiers on separate occasions, one suffering from combat fatigue (which is no joke) and the other from malaria and other illnesses. Patton also enjoyed an intimate relationship with his niece, a Red Cross donut girl, who accompanied him in England and France, much to his wife’s displeasure.

Those slapping incidents cost Patton a bit in the way of professional esteem but it didn’t cost any lives. And it didn’t cause him any remorse. Even in his “apology,” he claims he was trying to “shame a coward.” What DID cost lives was Patton’s cobbling together a small task force to liberate a POW camp in Germany shortly before the war’s end, when such a dangerous move was no longer necessary. “Task Force Baum” was recognized by its leaders for the lost cause it was, a plunge deep into enemy territory without any backup. There were 53 vehicles and 294 men. All the vehicles were destroyed or captured. Twenty-five of the men were killed, 32 wounded, and almost all the rest captured. The purpose of the mission, it was tacitly agreed, was to rescue Patton’s son-in-law.

His fitful harshness towards his troops is usually justified in the movie, even if it looks excessive. The soldier-slapping scene is preceded by one in which Patton kneels in the hospital, whispers something to a soldier whose face is covered by bandages, and lovingly places a medal on his chest. Next thing he encounters: Tim Considine, fully dressed, sitting up, and sobbing with self pity. Earlier, when Patton asks a cook why he’s not wearing sidearms, the cook laughs genially and replies, “Sidearms? Why, hell, General, I’m a cook!” I missed the part where cooks learn to laugh in the face of orders from a general, but it gives Patton a chance to tear everybody a new one.

Everyone paid for Patton’s ambition and vanity, even those not under his command. The gasoline and other supplies he diverted to his own forces during the run through France helped him alright, but they were also needed elsewhere.

The movie’s subtitle is “Salute to a Rebel.” Very stylish for 1970 audiences, but the material is presented in such a way as to leave us with a lingering admiration for Patton’s genius and bullheadedness. What kind of “rebel” was he? He was more of an authoritarian Arschloch than anybody else in his greater vicinity.

What the writers, the director, and George C. Scott have given us, to paraphrase someone else, is not a warts-and-all portrait but the suggestion that there is something heroic about a wart.

I gave the movie high marks because it’s as well done as it is — disregarding its relationship to Patton himself. I didn’t mind so much that the wrong tanks were used and that the production could only find two Heinkel 111s in flying condition. The location shooting is great, the cinematography crisp and unimpeachable, the score one of Goldsmith’s best, and Scott’s performance deserved whatever awards it got.

Review By: rmax304823 Rating: 9 Date: 2005-02-12

Other Information:

Original Title Patton
Release Date 1970-01-25
Release Year 1970

Original Language en
Runtime 2 hr 52 min (172 min)
Budget 12000000
Revenue 89800000
Status Released
Rated PG
Genre Biography, Drama, War
Director Franklin J. Schaffner
Writer Francis Ford Coppola, Edmund H. North, Ladislas Farago
Actors George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Stephen Young
Country United States
Awards Won 7 Oscars. 24 wins & 8 nominations total
Production Company N/A
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) (Westrex Recording System), Mono (35 mm prints), DTS 70 mm (70 mm re-release)
Aspect Ratio 2.20 : 1, 2.35 : 1 (35 mm prints)
Camera N/A
Laboratory DeLuxe, Hollywood (CA), USA (color by) (as De Luxe®)
Film Length 4,700 m (Sweden, 35 mm), 5,875 m (Sweden, 70 mm)
Negative Format 65 mm (Eastman 100T 5254)
Cinematographic Process Dimension 150 (photographed in) (as Dimension 150®)
Printed Film Format 35 mm (anamorphic), 70 mm

Patton 1970 123movies
Patton 1970 123movies
Patton 1970 123movies
Patton 1970 123movies
Patton 1970 123movies
Patton 1970 123movies
Patton 1970 123movies
Original title Patton
TMDb Rating 7.5 765 votes

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