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The Untouchables 1987 123movies

The Untouchables 1987 123movies

What are you prepared to do?119 Min.
Your rating: 0
8 1 vote

Summary:

#123movies #fmovies #putlocker #gomovies #solarmovie #soap2day Watch Full Movie Online Free – After building an empire with bootleg alcohol, legendary crime boss Al Capone rules Chicago with an iron fist. Though Prohibition Agent Eliot Ness attempts to take Capone down, even his best efforts fail due to widespread corruption within the Windy City’s police force. Recruiting an elite group of lawmen who won’t be swayed by bribes or fear, including Irish-American cop Jimmy Malone, Ness renews his determination to bring Capone to justice.
Plot: Young Treasury Agent Elliot Ness arrives in Chicago and is determined to take down Al Capone, but it’s not going to be easy because Capone has the police in his pocket. Ness meets Jimmy Malone, a veteran patrolman and probably the most honorable one on the force. He asks Malone to help him get Capone, but Malone warns him that if he goes after Capone, he is going to war.
Smart Tags: #prohibition_era #prohibition #chicago_illinois #al_capone_character #tax_evasion #corruption #crime_boss #mafia #organized_crime #gangster_film #reference_to_al_capone #u.s._history #1930s #american_mafia #mafia_boss #irish_cop #bootlegging #crime_syndicate #criminal_organization #criminal_underworld #italian_american_policeman


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The Untouchables 1987 123movies 1The Untouchables 1987 123movies 27.9/10 Votes: 295,805
The Untouchables 1987 123movies 3The Untouchables 1987 123movies 283%
The Untouchables 1987 123movies 5The Untouchables 1987 123movies 279/100
The Untouchables 1987 123movies 7The Untouchables 1987 123movies 27.8 Votes: 4325 Popularity: 25.227

Reviews:

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Capone starring Tom Hardy is being released this week, so I decided to visit a classic from the late 80s that also features Al Capone (this time portrayed by Robert De Niro). One of my 2020’s resolutions is to review older films, classics that I never wrote about, and maybe go through a director’s filmography before his/her next big movie. I’ll also try to review previous films inside a franchise, for example, before the live-action Mulan is released, I’ll definitely rewatch and review the 1998’s original. You get my point.

The Untouchables is one of those classics I’ve already seen a few times, but I can’t quite recall the last time I watched it, so it almost felt like a whole new release since I didn’t remember most plot points. I really enjoyed experiencing such a great period gangster movie again. The cast is incredible, and I’ll get there, but I need to start with the impressive production level for a 1987’s flick. From the set design to the well-crafted action sequences, everything looks and feels like Chicago during the Prohibition Era.

I love how the dialogues are played out. Nowadays, it’s not that common to have an entire film filled with long, uncut conversations between the characters. Most directors just employ the unimaginative “line-cut-line” type of dialogue. I’m not the biggest fan of Brian DePalma, even though he started one of my favorite action sagas of all-time (Mission: Impossible). However, his blocking/framing skills are outstanding in this movie. Every actor’s movement is followed seamlessly by the camera (DP: Stephen H. Burum), making every single shot count.

The screenplay is very well-structured. Every time the film starts lacking energy, something impactful occurs. A great action scene, a new story development that changes the course of the narrative, or a character’s decision that makes the viewer worried about an inevitable outcome. Consequently, The Untouchables rarely loses its momentum, it’s always entertaining in some shape or form. The four characters that constitute the title group are all emotionally compelling, and their actors offer extraordinary performances… except for the lead, Kevin Costner.

I don’t know if people might consider this a hot take or not, but I find Costner’s display extremely one-dimensional. During the movie, he goes through life-threatening situations, people that he cares about die, and he eventually gets face-to-face with Al Capone. His facial expression looks awkwardly almost identical in all of these scenes, and many more. It’s his first big film, the one that catapulted him into stardom, but I’m not the first to find his acting rangeless in this flick. Nevertheless, it doesn’t become that big of a distraction that I can’t connect with his character.

Regarding the rest of the cast, Sean Connery steals the show with his portrayal of Jim Malone. He’s charming and funny, but when he needs to take his character through a very dark and dramatic scene, he has no problems in delivering an exceptional performance. The young Andy Garcia (George Stone) proves that he had the chops to become a great actor (which he did), and Charles Martin Smith is surprisingly witty as Oscar Wallace. My main issue with the movie involves the lack of screentime given to Robert De Niro as Al Capone.

Sure, it’s a story about the people who got the famous gangster, and not a biography of the latter. However, not only it’s a waste of a phenomenal actor, but also a waste of a potentially great character. Al Capone is supposedly a quite clever businessman and ruthless crime boss, possessing an unusually well-protected organization, but he only appears in a few scattered scenes, like he’s just some random villain that the good guys need to defeat. Granted, they’re really cool scenes, but he doesn’t feel like the massive threat that the film assumes he is since the viewer barely gets to know Al Capone and how he holds so much power.

All in all, The Untouchables still holds up incredibly well after more than thirty years. Production-wise, not only the sets and costumes seamlessly resemble the Prohibition Era, but Brian DePalma’s technically impressive blocking and framing are a joy to watch. Long, captivating, uncut dialogues are elevated by a remarkable cast (Sean Connery is undoubtedly the standout), despite Kevin Costner lacking a bit of emotional range. Even the action sequences of this 1987’s movie look better than a lot of blockbusters of today. David Mamet writes a well-structured screenplay that rarely loses interest and featuring exceptionally compelling characters. Addictive score from Ennio Morricone as well. However, both Robert De Niro and his character, Al Capone, are underused, especially the latter. For such an important character who constantly changes the path of the narrative, the lack of screentime doesn’t allow the viewer to understand Al Capone’s motivations or feel how much of a threat he truly is. Still, it’s a classic worthy of a rewatch, and I definitely recommend it.

Rating: A-

Review By: msbreviews Rating: 8 Date: 2020-05-13
Never stop fighting till the fight is done, here endeth the lesson.

As good a gangster movie that has ever been made as DePalma does justice to Mamet’s electric script. The acting on show is right out of the top draw, the inevitable ease that DeNiro puts menace into Capone is quite impressive, whilst the fresh faced pugnacious tenacity of Andy Garcia’s George Stone is something of a delightful experience. Yet that is not enough because we still need the central actors to carry the film if it is going to triumph. Connery is a given performance wise (accent aside of course, but then again who cares when the character portrayal is as sharp as it is here?) but it is Costner as Eliot Ness that shines like the star he was soon to become, it’s a magic performance that manages to fuse genuine tenderness of family love with little trips to the dark side in pursuit of making good triumph over evil.

I love that the film is showing how violence and fear affects families, mother and child is a theme that is central to the film’s heartbeat, notice how some of the more violent scenes are followed by tender scenes of Ness and his family. The set pieces here are attention grabbing entertainment, a roaring Canadian border rumpus and a smashing roof top pursuit and face off are top value, but it’s DePalma gold watching a brilliant Battleship Potemkin homage at the Union train station that takes the cake as the film enters the last quarter. Surely historical facts does not matter when films are as sharp as this one is?. It’s frightening, touching, and even witty. So for me at least, the film is 10/10 in every department (and yes, even with Sean’s accent).

Footnote: The academy saw fit to nominate Ennio Morricone for his wonderful score, yet strangely he used some of it for the main theme in John Carpenter’s 1982 film “The Thing”, they must have missed it that time I presume! Must be the genre angle one thinks…

Review By: John Chard Rating: 10 Date: 2020-01-12
My Favorite!
Quite a few words spring to my mind when I think of The Untouchables. Words like: Excellence, entertainment, larger than life and Sean Connery. These words basically summarize the entire film from my point of view of course because in my opinion (which I don’t expect people to agree with) this is the best gangster film there is. Obviously people aren’t going to agree because people prefer the likes of the operatic Godfather trilogy or the ultra realistic Goodfellas but in my head The Untouchables is the best.

Here are a few reasons why. First reason is that The Untouchables is just so darn entertaining. All the other films had completely different aims and even though I love a deep and brilliant story my main objective when I see a film is to be entertained and basically no film does that better than The Untouchables. That does not mean, however, that The Untouchables is just some half baked action comedy. No. There is genuine emotion and real story in this film. The story is, as most people know, loosely based on the actual events during the prohibition era in USA in the 1920s (the story is also based very, very loosely on the series that go by the same name) which to some extent means that what we see on the screen is real making the characters and general story seem that much more believable. This also adds greatly to the already very high entertainment value of the film because it draws the audience in. To add to the realism of the film the dialog is also very memorable and there are some great one-liners including some of my all time favorites in this film.

The acting is nothing short of brilliant. This is without a doubt Kevin Costner’s best role. Some people have remarked that he seemed stiff and unable to portray the emotion of the character and to that I can only ask: Were we watching the same movie?! He is a hundred percent believable all the way through. In the beginning he seems a bit too much like a square I-wanna-do-some-good kind of character but as the story progresses he really evolves and becomes more and more emotionally involved in what he does. Both in his friends and in the cause. He even bends some of the rules he initially tried so hard to uphold. Brilliant. Charles Martin Smith does a good job as well and even though his character is very limited he still manages to pull the audience in. Andy Garcia appears in this film in a very limited role as well and he serves his purpose brilliantly. He is the sharpshooter of the group and he is perfectly believable in that part. He doesn’t get to say much but what he does get to say is said with as much passion as I have ever heard from him (he seemed a little stale and lifeless in Godfather III). Robert DeNiro is great as Al Capone. He steals every scene he is in and he really brings the larger-than-life quality to the character which is extremely fitting. The film’s best performance belongs to Sean Connery though. The film is for lack of a better expression a Sean Connery tour-de-force. Not only does he steal every scene he is in but he also brings the certain indescribable something to the character that he always does and in every situation you feel with him (as you do in all his films whether he is a villain or a hero). He also got a well deserved Oscar for his performance. People have claimed that the Oscar wasn’t as much for this particular performance but an Oscar in recognition of his contributions to the film industry. This belittles his performance which I can safely say is the best of his career and one of the best displays of acting that I have ever seen.

The film also has a memorable score made by the legendary Ennio Morricone who is perhaps best known for the work he did with the equally legendary western director Sergio Leone (who doesn’t know the score from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly) and in my opinion the score he did for The Untouchables is the best he has ever made. The score is very unlike most scores from the 80s which does that the film doesn’t feel like an 80s film as much as Scarface which I find inferior to this masterpiece. The score is grand and epic just like the story and the effects. For an 80s movie the effects are pretty amazing. Once again everything works.

All in all The Untouchables is a riveting story which is highly recommendable to all fans of crime/gangster movies.

10/10 – on my top 10 of best films

Review By: MinorityReporter Rating: 9 Date: 2005-09-21
“You fellows are untouchable, is that the thing?”
There are two great sit-up-and-take notice moments in “The Untouchables”, and if you’ve seen the movie you know what they are. The first is when Robert De Niro’s Al Capone decides to take batting practice on one of the members of his Chicago mob. I guess the guy wasn’t a team player. The other occurred in the latter half of the story, usually described as the baby carriage scene, and which may itself have been inspired by the 1925 silent film, “Battleship Potemkin”. What I find incredible is that I’ve just watched these two movies back to back, and am constantly amazed when my viewing experience offers moments of cosmic serendipity like this kind of coincidence. For the reader who might not know what I’m talking about, you’ll recognize the events if you see both films, and you don’t have to do it the way I did. The scenes stand out in a way that makes them memorable whenever you watch the films.

If I was casting this picture, I wouldn’t have chosen Charles Martin Smith to play Agent Oscar Wallace. Smith has the type of face and demeanor that calls for roles like the ones he’s portrayed in “American Graffiti” and “The Buddy Holly Story”. Be that as it may, he did a credible job as part of the Untouchables team. Another scene that’s a grabber occurred when beat-cop Jim Malone (Sean Connery) ‘killed’ a dead man to convince a potential snitch that he should testify against Boss Capone. That was a daring ploy that worked pretty well.

The one thing I wish film makers and script writers would avoid is denying historical facts when coming up with a story line. Here I’m thinking about the death of Frank Nitti (Billy Drago) as established in the movie, a major departure from the real event. Nitti actually committed suicide, despondent over indictments handed down for extorting the Hollywood film industry to avoid union problems while filming. The ‘accidental’ death of Nitti shown in the film may have added to the drama of a dedicated Eliott Ness (Kevin Costner), but if you know the real story, something like that only makes you groan.

Review By: classicsoncall Rating: 8 Date: 2018-03-01

Other Information:

Original Title The Untouchables
Release Date 1987-06-03
Release Year 1987

Original Language en
Runtime 1 hr 59 min (119 min)
Budget 25000000
Revenue 76270454
Status Released
Rated R
Genre Crime, Drama, Thriller
Director Brian De Palma
Writer David Mamet, Oscar Fraley, Eliot Ness
Actors Kevin Costner, Sean Connery, Robert De Niro
Country United States
Awards Won 1 Oscar. 11 wins & 16 nominations total
Production Company N/A
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints), Dolby Stereo (35 mm prints), DTS-ES (Blu-ray), Dolby Digital EX (DVD)
Aspect Ratio 2.20 : 1 (70 mm prints), 2.35 : 1
Camera Panavision Panaflex Gold, Panavision C-Series Lenses
Laboratory Technicolor, Hollywood (CA), USA, Technicolor, New York (NY), USA (dailies)
Film Length 3,280 m (Sweden)
Negative Format 35 mm (Eastman 125T 5247, 400T 5294)
Cinematographic Process Panavision (anamorphic)
Printed Film Format 35 mm (Eastman 5384), 70 mm (blow-up) (Eastman 5384)

The Untouchables 1987 123movies
The Untouchables 1987 123movies
The Untouchables 1987 123movies
The Untouchables 1987 123movies
The Untouchables 1987 123movies
The Untouchables 1987 123movies
Original title The Untouchables
TMDb Rating 7.8 4,325 votes

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